PAD 2021 – Day 7

One week down!! Today’s seemingly simple prompt proved rather difficult for me. NaPoWriMo.net asked poets pick from or combine two kinds of short form poetry – the shadorma, and the Fib. The shadorma is a six-line, 26-syllable poem (or a stanza – you can write a poem that is made of multiple shadorma stanzas). The syllable count by line is 3/5/3/3/7/5. The Fib is a six-line form where the syllable count is based off the Fibonacci sequence of 1/1/2/3/5/8. You can  link multiple Fibs together into a multi-stanza poem, or even start going backwards after your first six lines, with syllable counts of 8/5/3/2/1/1. I tried linking one of each, but haven’t landed on any sort of title.

There 
are 
pockets
of darkness
I never want to
stop myself from dipping into.

Like a tongue
rubbing a raw cut
on the gum,
hoping that
each twinge will be testimony
or reason to be. 
Photo by Engin Akyurt on Pexels.com

PAD 2020 – Day 25

This weekend I’m participating in CV2‘s 2-Day poem contest, where poets have 48 hours to compose a poem using 10 given, and often challenging words. It’s the fifth time I’ve participated, and it never gets old. But it does mean I have a bit less time to devote to the regular poem-a-day challenge. So, today’s poem is a quickie inspired by the Stroll of Poets prompt to write about something “in the margins.”

 

The Wizardry of Some Poems

searching the margins

for the invisible ink

that makes them magic

 

black twist pen on notebook

Photo by Mohammad Danish on Pexels.com

PAD 2017 – Day 26

I regret to say that I didn’t have much time today to thoughtfully consider a poem about “regret”, which is the Writer’s Digest prompt. But, this micro did spring pretty quickly to mind.

Worst Words

Pointless but potent
heart sting of
If only

 

A few nights ago I had the pleasure of attending a Edmonton Poetry Festival reading, and discovering that poet Angela Kublik is a staff member at my own, beloved local library. I have read some of Ms. Kublik’s work in the past, and adore the anthologies she’s co-edited: Home and Away: Alberta’s Finest Poets Muse on the Meaning of Home and Writing the Land: Alberta through its Poets. Being a huge fan of haibun, I particularly enjoyed Ms. Kublik’s “An Unsuspecting Lump of Clay” series which was published on DailyHaiku.org.